Educational Administration Student Awards

Educational Administration Ph.D. students may be eligible for the following awards to further education or research.

Richard P. Manatt Fellowship

The Richard P. Manatt Fellowship was created in honor of Dr. Dick Manatt, University Professor of Educational Administration at Iowa State University, who served as a teacher, counselor, school administrator, and professor during a distinguished career that spanned nearly 50 years. As a university professor and director of the School Improvement Model (SIM), he supervised research projects totaling more than $5 million and authored five books and more than 100 articles. Dr. Manatt is perhaps best known by his students for his exceptional commitment to their personal and professional development. During his nearly 40 years at ISU, he served as major professor for 175 Ph.D. students in educational administration. His dedication to mentoring graduates of the program and supporting their work continued long after they received their degrees. Upon Dr. Manatt’s retirement in May 2002, his students and friends established the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship, which provides partial funding to support and develop the nation’s best educational administration scholars as they pursue the Iowa State University doctoral program in Educational Administration.

Current recipients

The Educational Administration faculty in the School of Education are pleased to announce this year’s recipients of the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship: Mark Ernst, David Ford, Aiddy Phomvisay, and Jesse Ulrich. Each receives a one-time award of $2000 towards their doctoral studies and were honored at the College of Human Sciences awards reception.

ernst-photo Mark Ernst of Ankeny, director of curriculum for Clear Creek Amana Community Schools, is one of four winners of the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Ernst previously earned his bachelor’s degree in English, master’s degree in curriculum and instructional technology, and Certificate of Advanced Studies for Superintendent Licensure, all from Iowa State University.

His career has included teaching secondary English, serving as a K-12 media specialist, and as a director of curriculum and technology. He lives in Ankeny with his wife Kate, daughter Elizabeth, and son Matthew.

ford-photo David Ford, district at-risk coordinator for the Southeast Polk Community School District, is one of four winners of the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Ford received a bachelor’s degree in sociology at St. Francis University in Pennsylvania, a master’s degree in counseling from The College of Saint Rose in New York, and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Drake University.

In his current job, Ford supervises at-risk and counseling programming for the Southeast Polk school district. He previously worked as a school counselor in the Grinnell-Newburg and Ankeny school districts, and as a counselor and behavior intervention specialist for 14 years in New York, California, and Oregon.

Ford’s background includes 11 years of teaching in numerous graduate programs in counseling and education. For the past five years, he has served as a clinical adjunct professor at Drake University teaching courses in counseling, education, and research. He recently began serving as an adjunct instructor for Buena Vista University, teaching courses in counseling and research.

He holds licenses in New York and Iowa in school counseling. He is licensed in Iowa as a PK-12 principal/special education supervisor and evaluator. His research interests include social justice and equity, particularly as they relate to college and career readiness.

Ford lives in Grinnell with his wife, Melissa, and two daughters, 8-year-old Annika and 5-year-old Emery. He enjoys relaxing with his family, cooking, collecting wine, and playing golf.

phomvisay-photo Marshalltown High School Principal Aiddy Phomvisay is one of four winners of the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Phomvisay is in his third year as the principal at Marshalltown High School. He previously worked as an associate principal at Valley High School in West Des Moines, taught ninth grade world studies and 10th grade U.S. history at Ames High School, and taught in an English Language Learner sheltered classroom.

He is a National Board Certified Teacher in social studies and history, and has taught classes at Drake University and Iowa State University.

In Ames and West Des Moines, Phomvisay held many leadership roles in various training and curriculum writing teams. He serves on the Iowa Department of Education English Language Learner Task Force and the external advisory committee for Iowa State’s Educator Preparation Coordinating Council. He has been a keynote speaker at the Iowa Culture and Language Conference, Our Kids Conference and Iowa Project Lead the Way Teacher Conference.

Prior to seeking his doctorate, Phomvisay received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Iowa State University, as well as a certificate of advanced studies (superintendent license). He also attended the James Madison Senior Fellowship Constitution Institute at Georgetown University.

He lives in Marshalltown with his family. His wife Mindy is an elementary music teacher and the director of music ministry at First Baptist Church in Ames. Their children Elijah, 11, and Emma, 9, are active in orchestra, band, dance, and school activities.

ulrich-photo Jesse Ulrich, superintendent of the A-H-S-T Community School District in Avoca and Walnut Community School District, is one of four winners of the Richard P. Manatt Fellowship in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Ulrich began his career as a social science instructor in Arizona and Iowa, as well as serving as a student services coordinator for middle school students. He received his bachelor’s degree from Buena Vista University, and his master’s degree and certificate of advanced studies (superintendent license) from Iowa State University. His research interest involves improving superintendent longevity.

Eligibility/nomination

All doctoral students in Educational Administration who demonstrate exceptional promise for scholarship, character, and school leadership are eligible to become Manatt Scholars.

Deadline: Applications are due each year in September.

More information: Dr. Joanne Marshall, jmars@iastate.edu, may be contacted for more information.

David L. Clark Graduate Student Research Seminar

The David L. Clark National Graduate Student Research Seminar in Educational Administration & Policy, sponsored by the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), Divisions A and L of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and Sage Publications, brings emerging educational administration and policy scholars and noted researchers together for two days of presentations, generative discussion, and professional growth. The majority of Clark Scholars go on to become professors at major research institutions around the world. This year’s seminar will be held in the spring at the beginning of the AERA meeting in San Franciso, and is tentatively scheduled for April 26-27, 2013.

Eligibility/nomination

Each university may nominate up to two students for the David L. Clark National Graduate Student Research Seminar in Educational Administration & Policy. Students may not self-nominate.

Eligibility:

  • Nominees should be outstanding doctoral students in educational leadership, administration, and/or policy, seeking careers in research.
  • Nominees must have substantially completed their courses and must have formulated a dissertation proposal.
  • Students who have already started or completed their dissertations are unlikely to gain as much from the seminar as students who are in the early stages of formulating their research.
  • Nominations of students from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged.

Process:

  • Nominations must be accompanied by a student research proposal.
  • The nomination form and the student research proposal are submitted online. To be considered, both forms must be filled out completely.
  • Student proposals are blind reviewed by three prominent scholars.
  • Seminar invitations are issued to 40 doctoral students, with competition based on the quality of the student’s proposal and their perceived capacity to gain from and contribute to the seminar.

More information: 434-243-1041, University Council for Educational Administration website

Deadline: November 1st, 2012

Jordan Larson Award

The Jordan Larson Award is in memory of Dr. Jordan Lewis Larson, a long-time school administrator in Iowa, who served as the superintendent in Ames in the early 1940s. After moving on to the superintendency at Mt. Vernon, NY, Dr. Larson was elected to the Presidency of the American Association of School Administrators and served during 1954 and 1955. This award for excellence is supported by a foundation grant made by Superintendent Larson’s daughter-in-law, Colleen Larson. The Jordan Larson Award includes a cash prize of $750 and a commemorative plaque.

Current recipients

tony-aylsworth-photo Carlisle High School Principal Tony Aylsworth is one of three winners of the Jordan Larson Award in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University.

Aylsworth earned his master’s degree, superintendent licensure, and doctorate degrees from Iowa State University. His dissertation was a four-year quantitative study of the relationship between teacher participation in a Professional Learning Community (PLC) and student academic achievement.

Prior to serving as principal in Carlisle, Aylsworth served as an assistant principal for five years in the Ankeny and Oskaloosa school districts. He was also a teacher, athletic coach, and sponsor in the Waukee Community School District.

dan-cox-photo Charles City schools Superintendent Daniel Cox is one of three winners of the Jordan Larson Award in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Cox received both his doctorate in educational administration and his certificate of advanced studies for superintendency at Iowa State University. Prior to that, he received his bachelor’s degree in social science and his master’s degree in Spanish teaching at the University of Northern Iowa.

He previously served as an adjunct instructor in educational administration at Iowa State, as an administrator with the Waterloo Community Schools, and as chief administrator of Valley Lutheran Middle and High School in Cedar Falls.

Prior to becoming an administrator, Cox taught high school Spanish and coached in the Essex and West Marshall school districts. His research interests include the use of social media by school administrators, school marketing and branding, and effective communication practices.

sauers-photo Nick Sauers, an assistant professor in educational policy studies at Georgia State University, is one of three winners of the Jordan Larson Award in educational administration, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University.

Sauers previously worked as the leadership training coordinator of the Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), which was housed at Iowa State prior to moving to the University of Kentucky. He was also an assistant research professor at the University of Kentucky. Prior to that, he was a principal and teacher.

His major areas of interest include K-12 leadership, school technology leadership, and social media in schools. He received his bachelor’s degree in elementary education at the University of Iowa, and his master’s degree in educational administration at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He attended West Lyon High School and previously worked in the East Sac County School District. 

Past recipients

Since 1981, the award has included the following winners:

  • 2011 - Pam Dodge
  • 2010 - Holly Kaptain
  • 2009 - Ryan G. Zonnefeld
  • 2008 - Pam Armstrong-Vogel
  • 2007 - John Chalstrom
  • 2006 - Mary Delagardelle
  • 2005 - Nanci Shaw
  • 2004 - Pam Stangeland
  • 2003 - Theron Schutte
  • 2002 - Amanda J. Ross
  • 2001 - Curtis Anthony Cain
  • 2000 - Linda Gray Smith
  • 1999 - Doyle F. Scott
  • 1998 - James R. Scharff
  • 1997 - David J. Wilkerson
  • 1996 - Teri J. Wilson
  • 1995 - Joan B. Wilcox & Kristin M. Nass
  • 1994 - L. Kay Forsythe
  • 1993 - Greg A. Robinson
  • 1992 - Les M. Omotani
  • 1991 - Linda Turner Fortenberry
  • 1990 - Linda Kay Munger
  • 1989 - Bruce E. Daniels
  • 1988 - Diana Bourisaw & David W. Peterson
  • 1987 - Marilyn M. Semones
  • 1986 - Barbara Davis Licklider
  • 1985 - David F. Darnell
  • 1984 - Ellen E. Look & Tim R. Westerberg
  • 1983 - Retia Scott Walker
  • 1982 - Brian L. Gustafson

UCEA Barbara L. Jackson Scholars Network

The Barbara L. Jackson Scholars Network is a two-year program that provides formal networking, mentoring, and professional development for graduate students of color who intend to become professors of educational leadership. The program was approved by members of the UCEA Plenum in November 2003 and has facilitated the development of a robust pipeline of faculty and graduate students of color in the field of educational leadership since. Because of this, Barbara Jackson Scholars and Alumni have enhanced the field of educational leadership and UCEA with their scholarship and expertise.

Eligibility/nomination

For more information on The Barbara L. Jackson Scholars Network, visit the University Council for Educational Administration website.

UCEA Excellence in Educational Leadership Award

The University Council on Educational Administration (UCEA) Excellence in Educational Leadership Award is given to a practicing school administrator in recognition of his or her significant contributions to the improvement of administrator preparation.

Current recipient

The Educational Administration faculty of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Iowa State University are pleased to announce Dr. Tim Taylor as the recipient of the University Council for Educational Administration 2012 Excellence in Educational Leadership award.

dr-taylor-uceaDr. Taylor is the superintendent of Ames Community School District, a position he has held since 2010. He has been active in Iowa education for over forty years, first as a social studies teacher and coach, then at the Iowa Department of Education as a program consultant. He has been active in statewide school reform, has worked to recruit under-represented populations to administration, and has consulted with districts across the state on issues such as assessment and planning. Dr. Taylor has worked with Iowa State’s preparation program as an adjunct instructor for the Human Resources class, bringing to it his extensive administrative experience as the Ames Deputy Superintendent for human resources. He has also informed the program about contemporary issues in the field by serving on program area and departmental advisory boards.

Jan and J.D. Beatty Education Administration Scholarship

The Jan and J.D. Beatty Education Administration Scholarship was created by Jan and J.D. Beatty to assist full-time educators seeking their leadership licensure. Both Beattys have long associations with Iowa State University, both as former students and as faculty. Jan is currently a clinical professor in educational administration; and J.D. currently serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, where he was assistant dean. The donors award two $500 scholarships annually.

Current recipients

The Educational Administration faculty in the School of Education is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of the Jan and J.D. Beatty Education Administration Scholarship: Matt Robie and Dania Wilson. Each receives a one-time award of $500 towards their studies towards licensure as a school administrator.

robie-photo Matt Robie, an instructional coach at Prairie Trail Elementary School in Ankeny, is one of two winners of the Jan and J.D. Beatty Education Administration Scholarship, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Robie is pursuing a master’s degree in educational administration at Iowa State University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in elementary education from the University of Northern Iowa, and his master’s degree in education from Michigan State University. He holds teaching endorsements in K-12 talented and gifted, K-8 reading, K-8 science, and coaching.

As an instructional coach, Robie helps teachers to improve their instructional practices that promote student growth. He has 15 years of teaching experience, first in an elementary classroom at North Polk Central Elementary, and more recently teaching gifted elementary and middle school students in Ankeny.

Robie is president of Iowa Talented and Gifted (ITAG), and has served on the ITAG Board of Directors since 2007. He also currently teaches two TAG endorsement courses for Drake University. He lives in Ankeny with his wife, Jann and their three boys: Luke, Nicholas, and Jack.

wilson-photo Dania Wilson, dean of students at Urbandale High School, is one of two winners of the Jan and J.D. Beatty Education Administration Scholarship, issued by the School of Education at Iowa State University. 

Wilson is working on her educational leadership degree through Iowa State University. She received her bachelor’s degree in English with an English/language arts teaching certification from the University of Iowa, and her reading endorsement from Upper Iowa University.

Prior to her current role, Wilson worked as an English teacher at Urbandale High School and was honored in 2010 as educator of the year in the Urbandale Community School District. She has worked extensively with smaller learning communities and spoke at the National Smaller Learning Community Conference in Miami, Florida.

Wilson also coached boys’ swimming and girls’ tennis for many years. She is married to Chris Wilson.

Eligibility/nomination

This award is available to students of graduate class standing. All awards are for one year and may be renewed at the discretion of the administering authority so long as recipients continue to meet the above stated criteria.

Eligibility:

  • Recipients should be enrolled in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies principal or superintendent licensure program as determined by the administering authority.
  • They must be employed full-time in an Iowa school district, an Iowa Area Education Association (AEA) or the Iowa Department of Education as determined by the administering authority.

Deadline: Applications are due each year in November. 

More information: Dr. Joanne Marshall, jmars@iastate.edu, may be contacted for more information.